Perceptions of Masculinity Expressed through Art

Similar to several psychological occurrences, males vary in levels of masculinity, as do females in their femininity. In a Testogen review, increasing testosterone levels also intensify a man’s aggressiveness, therefore, producing dominant or alpha males. Aggression can be a beneficial characteristic, this opposes to what most people think. Being aggressive means making an individual more daring or fearless, reactive and alert. Testosterone also aids spatial capability that is attested to be beneficial in battle or combats and other professions. But does these embrace the whole notion of masculinity?

There are certain questions as to how masculinity is perceived. Does masculinity exist in the mind or in the physique? Does one develop masculinity by going to the gym or by being the breadwinner of the family? What makes masculinity delicate and harmful? When does one’s masculinity flourish and when is it endangered or vulnerable?

Roman Stollenwerk, curator of “ManUp!”, a multimedia display at the Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art, highlighted art creations that illustrated the altering and varying figures and characters of masculinity in the 21st century.

Artists who contributed to the exhibit explored virility or manliness as a continual series of executed practices or activities and acquired customs instead of seeing manhood as an attribute that is genetic and hereditary.

These all converge to look like a permanent personality or character. Collage, photography, watercolor, and varied medium were used and displayed by the artisans to visualize or picture their perception of masculinity or manliness.

Some of the featured works were that of Cassils. Trans-masculine, performance artist, bodybuilder and stunt person who use their physical form or body as a medium of art. They submit themselves to extreme bodily challenges to demonstrate that the human body is continually changing.

On the other hand, artist Amy Elkins depicted masculinity as softness and grace over strength. She had photographed young male ballet and contemporary dancers ages 12 to 21 who dared gendered beliefs by merging remarkable athleticism with elegance, openness, and calmness.

The artisans of the said exhibit presented another vision of manhood. They casted-off the knowledge and stereotyping of an “ideal man” where some will be unsuccessful in. They supported the impression and awareness that individuals must be liberated and permitted to express themselves through their own physique, movements, and undertakings as they shape and create their individuality like creations of art.